2 Day Conference - 2nd and 3rd June 2020

 

Emotions Part 1: 2nd June 2020

Understanding Emotions and Strategies to Develop Self-Regulation

 

Emotions Part 2: 3rd June 2020

Emotions-based Strategies to Foster Relationship Development and
Academic & Career Performance

 

Central London - Coin Street Conference Centre, SE1 9NH

 

Overview of the Emotions series:

In our two-course Emotions series, explore how emotions are the undercurrent of all forms of social communication and are at the heart of personal problem solving, motivation, relationships, and life memories (episodic memory). This information applies to everyone, including typically developing individuals, but this series focuses on teaching about emotion to individuals with social-emotional learning challenges. Across the two courses, discover how to teach students, clients, and patients about their emotions and build self-regulation across three contexts: 1. Me: pursuing goals to meet the individual’s needs; 2. We: working collectively to be part of a group (e.g., in the classroom, on the playground, at a restaurant, on a team); 3. Us: interacting face-to-face with one or more people. Engage in hands-on activities and explore use of treatment* scales and frameworks to help your students, clients, and patients unpack the social-emotional experience and understand how emotions take center stage in all aspects of life.

 

Who should attend

Parents and professionals supporting children from age 5 to adult. At our conferences we share our latest frameworks, lessons, and strategies for teaching social thinking with a wide variety of interventionists, including: speech-language therapists, occupational therapists, teachers, social workers, counselors, clinical and educational and clinical psychologists, behaviour specialists, and school administrators to name a few. It’s also used by family members and caregivers across settings.

 

 

Day 1 (2nd June 2020)

 

Conference:

Emotions Part 1: Understanding Emotions and Strategies to Develop Self-Regulation

 

Speaker:  Michelle Garcia Winner

 

Emotions Part 1:

In this first course in the series, explore information and research-based treatment ideas spanning these topics to help individuals understand and regulate their emotions:

 

  • The negative¬–positive emotional framework and how the brain processes negative emotions differently than positive emotions
  • Emotions and personal memory making (episodic memories), which are required in all environments, including in school, community, home, and vocational settings
  • Memory and narrative language: how emotions impact how we explain ourselves to others
  • Strategies to break the cycle when a student, client, or patient gets stuck recalling only negative experiences
  • The difference between feelings and emotions
  • Hands-on activities to explore the depth and complexity of an individual’s feelings and emotions. Practice using treatment tools (e.g., visual scales, treatment frameworks, etc.) that help make the complicated social experience more explicit and understandable
  • The definition of self-conscious emotions and their tie to social anxiety
  • How emotions are embedded within the Social Thinking–Social Competency Model
  • How Superflex’s Worry Wall and other Unthinkable characters can be used to encourage expression of the emotional self to foster self-regulation
  • The use of manipulatives to guide individuals to express their feelings and experiences, and to socially problem solve when language falls short
  • Case study: Review of longitudinal treatment for a grumpy 13-year-old; how the invention of the Pyramid of Dislike, paired with Social Thinking’s Friendship Pyramid, provided self-discovery and motivation to increase peer engagement and emotional satisfaction
  • And much more!

 

Learn a lot to help your students, clients, and patients—and a lot about yourself, given how this fascinating topic impacts us all!

 

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe two major ways our brains process negative emotions differently than positive emotions.
  2. Explain how graphing one’s feelings across a day contributes to the development of emotional self-awareness.
  3. Explain the role of self-conscious emotions play in social self-awareness.
  4. Explain how emotional reappraisal helps ward off depression and why.
  5. Illustrate how to create a Pyramid of Dislike to complement an individual’s exploration of Social Thinking’s Friendship Pyramid.
  6. Explain why getting perspective is more important than taking perspective when seeking to understand an individual’s experience.

 

 

Day 2 (3rd June 2020)

 

Conference:

Emotions Part 2: Emotion-Based Strategies to Foster Relationship Development and Academic and Career Performance

 

Speaker: - Michelle Garcia Winner

 

Emotions are at the heart of connecting with others and forming community. We expect children and adults to intuitively navigate the abstract nature of emotions by having emotional self-awareness and self-regulation, inferring the emotions of others, reading others’ intentions, etc. These skills are required for developing relationships, understanding the actions of characters in literature and history, working as part of a team, and much more—impacting performance on academic standards and success in the 21st century workplace. In this second course in our two-part series on emotions, learn novel treatment tools and strategies to help students, clients, and patients develop emotional awareness, explore how to read the emotions and intentions of others, emotionally sync with others, and work through social anxiety. To maximize your learning we recommend attending the course Emotions Part 1 before Emotions Part 2, but it’s not required since key concepts from the first course will be summarized in the second.

 

To maximize your learning we recommend attending the course Emotions Part 1 before Emotions Part 2, but it’s not required since key concepts from the first course will be summarized in the second. In Emotions Part 2, learn strategies to help your students, clients, or patients develop emotional awareness, explore how to read the emotions and intentions of others, emotionally sync with others, and work through social anxiety. Many of these skills are required for developing friendships, understanding the actions and reactions of characters in literature and history—impacting performance on academic standards, and working with others as part of a team—impacting success in the classroom and 21st century workforce. Discover a variety of strategies that can be used immediately in the classroom, at home, in the community, and at work spanning these topics:

 

  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and autism spectrum:
    • Recognize the overlap of these diagnoses and the importance of developing social competencies as part of treatment*
    • Determine key things to be aware of when working with an individual suffering from depression or sadness
  • Social-emotional learning:
    • Validate the social-emotional learning process as individuals explore their social vulnerabilities
    • Recognize the power of one’s inner critic and coach
    • Understand how managing emotions is part of executive functioning and how this relates to tracking the development of one’s own Social Operating System
  • The social evaluative process: how we account for each other’s intentions
  • Interpreting the hidden emotional messages of others
  • Personal self-marketing campaign: what messages are your students, clients, and patients sending?
  • Use of scales for many different purposes:
    • Evaluate social risk
    • Evaluate social-emotional experiences
    • Get versus take someone’s perspective
  • Relationship development and social-emotional competencies:
    • Explore how little acts of kindness pave the way for relationship development prior to having a conversation
    • Determine how emotion syncing is important as we share and listen to little stories within our social conversations
    • Use physical manipulatives to encourage social-emotional reappraisal of people in context
  • Case study: learn how to validate your student, client, or patient’s progress by addressing vulnerabilities with a Social Operating System

 

Learn a lot to help your students, clients, and patients—and a lot about yourself, given how this fascinating topic impacts us all!

 

*Treatment refers to using conceptual and strategy-based frameworks to help individuals improve their social competencies.

 

What you will learn

  1. Explain how social risk is different than social discomfort and why in treatment we encourage individuals to be comfortable with discomfort.
  2. Explain why social anxiety is common in individuals on the autism spectrum and with ADHD who have solid social self-awareness.
  3. Describe what is meant by acts of “micro-communication.”
  4. Explain how the Emotion Syncing thinksheet guides individuals to embed emotional experiences into their conversational language.
  5. Explain at least three clear steps for teaching students how to initiate peer-to-peer greetings to be perceived as approachable, and possibly friendly.
  6. Describe how to help students document the development of their Social Operating System.

 

(back)

 

 

Note: To benefit from the programme the children and young adults need to have sufficient verbal comprehension skills. For more information contact: info@sltcommunicationcourses.co.uk

©2019 SLT Communication Courses